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The Arts Scene: 10x10x10xTieton features big art in small spaces

10x10x10xTieton juried exhibition invites artists from all over the world to create work no larger than 10 inches in any dimension. This year’s call for artists resulted in 1,073 entries. Luckily, entries were submitted digitally using an online system called callforentry.org, as this would take up a lot of room in the warehouse.

Even though the works are no larger than 10 inches, I pondered how much space they would take up if they were all exactly 10 inches. The artworks would cover a distance of 894 feet, almost 1.5 times the height of the Space Needle, which is 605 feet tall.

To choose the final pieces for the exhibit, Beth Sellars and Christina Orr-Cahall were asked to review each of the submissions. Sellars has served as a curator in the Pacific Northwest for 42 continuous years, most recently as co-founder/curator of Suyama Space for 19 years. Orr-Cahall has been engaged in curatorial and leadership positions in museums throughout her career. Most recently she was the CEO of Seattle’s Experience Music Project, commonly known as MoPOP.

The two jurors pared down the entries to just 194 pieces for the show. It was not an easy process for the jurors, who “tried to respond to the wide range of media submitted — photography, paint, mixed media, glass, ceramic, wood, metal, plastic, a variety of prints, fiber and more. The 10x10x10 format (or working within those dimensions) was more difficult to achieve in some mediums and in certain ‘styles’ than in others, but challenges for artists are invigorating,” Orr-Cahall notes.

She continues: “I look forward to seeing the actual pieces and to meet the artists who created them. You bring to Tieton your vast talents and your commitment to making art a part of our lives.”

Making artwork selections with a second juror “was a study in contrasts and compromises with both of us bringing diverse aesthetic perspectives to the process,” says Sellars. “A two-juror format changes the dynamic from a singular juror, but it also increases the possibilities for consideration. We are hopeful our selections have made for a rich viewing experience.”

The final 10x10x10xTieton exhibit features artwork by 143 artists from all over the world, including China, Canada, Ireland, Alaska, Hawaii and across the U.S., with many from right here in the Pacific Northwest. All works are printed in a handbound exhibition catalogue by Marquand Books that is made in Tieton at Paper Hammer Studios.

Each exhibiting artist receives a free copy, and additional copies are available for purchase.

Upon reflection of the selection process as a whole, Sellars states, “It is important for those artists not included in this particular exhibition to remember there will be many more opportunities to submit work for jury review under different criteria and circumstances. It is vital that the work continue to be seen. Art created in solitude must ultimately be destined to initiate a dialogue with the viewing public. The more frequently the artist attempts to initiate this dialogue, the more benefits are reaped by artist and viewer.

“Mighty Tieton is a miracle in itself. This exhibition is only one of many creative opportunities initiated by the founding organization. I appreciate having played a tiny part in its ongoing phenomenon.”

Visitors can view the 10x10x10xTieton exhibition through Oct. 6 during regular gallery hours from 4-7 p.m. Fridays and noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. The Mighty Tieton Warehouse Gallery is at 608 Wisconsin Ave. in Tieton.

• David Lynx is executive director of the Larson Gallery at Yakima Valley College. Learn more at www.larsongallery.org.

Reach Tammy Ayer at tayer@yakimaherald.com or on Facebook.

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