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The Arts Scene: East meets West with Delma Tayer

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Driving up to Oak Hollow, I was wondering why artist Delma Tayer titled her show “The West Meets the East.”

After walking in the door of the gallery, it was immediately apparent why. Hung tightly on the walls were paintings of Eastern Washington landscapes among collages with Japanese characters.

Having been lucky enough to visit Delma’s home, I noticed right away that we both enjoyed an Asian aesthetic. Just like the subject of her artworks, it is mixed in with Western influences.

The collages are particularly fascinating, not only because of the Japanese characters but that they are collections of ripped pieces of something else. It is almost as if we are getting to see only a little piece of some larger subject that is residing in another place. These little glimpses are set together to convey a meaning of tiny phrases in a much larger treatise.

The handmade papers used to create the collages, Delma said, were purchased in Japan. She would travel back and forth to Japan with her son. The Japanese aesthetic is one that is very interesting to her, as she refers to the restraint and skill used. The handmade papers are an art form.

In between Japan and the mainland United States is Hawaii, of course. It is here that, literally, the East and West meet. Delma enjoyed her time at Poipu Beach, where she took up watercolors. As she said, “You can’t use oil paint in someone else’s condo.”

Delma Tayer studied English literature, art and philosophy in college. She taught English composition and literature, humanities and art history for 25 years at Yakima Valley College and served as director of the Larson Gallery for 15 years. During her career she has exhibited paintings and ceramics. Although she has retired from teaching, she says she will never retire as an artist.

You can visit with Delma at a special reception at Oak Hollow Gallery from 5-7 p.m. Friday.

• David Lynx is executive director of the Larson Gallery. Learn more at www.larsongallery.org.

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