A man convicted of abducting two women from downtown Yakima in 1990 and raping one of them is back in a state facility for sexually violent predators after violating conditions of his release.

John Robinson, 66, was released from the Special Commitment Center on McNeil Island on Feb. 17 to live in the Tacoma area. He was sent back to McNeil Island on April 22 after violating the conditions of his release under the terms of an agreement approved by Yakima County Superior Court Judge Kevin Naught.

The agreement allowed Robinson to move into what is considered a less restrictive alternative to the McNeil Island facility, where the state keeps sexually violent predators after their prison terms end. But Robinson, who had been confined there since 2006, was also told he would be taken into custody if he violated any of the terms.

Chris Wright, a spokesman for the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, said Robinson was returned for a noncriminal violation of his less restrictive alternative agreement. The office operates the center’s programs that provide specialized mental health treatment for civilly committed sex offenders.

Information on which restriction or restrictions Robinson violated was unavailable by press time.

Conditions for Robinson’s release were strict. His whereabouts were tracked electronically, and he could go on approved outings only if someone was monitoring him. He was restricted in what he could read or watch on TV or online. And Robinson, his property and computers could be searched by a parole officer at any time.

He also was required to undergo treatment, have no contact with his victims or anyone younger than 18, keep a log of all his incoming and outgoing phone calls and register as a sex offender. Robinson was required to stay in Pierce County, except for treatment appointments in King County. Any travel would need to be along a pre-approved route.

There are 195 residents at the Special Commitment Center, Wright said in an email, and 59 people in less restrictive alternatives throughout Washington.

Residents are returned fairly regularly to the island for violating the conditions of their (less restrictive alternative). For example, two others were also returned the same month that Robinson was, he said.

Robinson was convicted in 1990 of kidnapping and raping Susan Libby Marable, who went missing on April 23, 1991, several weeks after he was sentenced and threatened her and her family in open court. Robinson was also convicted of kidnapping and attempting to rape another woman.

Marable is still missing, and her family fought Robinson’s release. Marable’s youngest sister, Robyn Shortt-Peery, who lives in Boise, said she isn’t surprised Robinson is back at McNeil. She recently contacted the state Attorney General’s Office to check Robinson’s status.

“I wish (Washington) and other states would take into serious consideration the history of the offender that they are releasing, that they would stop with the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to conditions on these (less restrictive alternative agreements) and paroling of violent offenders, that they would not rely so heavily on the textbook opinions of the so-called experts,” she said.

“They give these guys chance after chance,” Shortt-Peery said.

Defense and state experts had agreed Robinson could be released into a less restrictive environment, but said that adequate safeguards had to be put in place to protect the public. At the same time, “they know he’s got all kinds of serious issues,” Shortt-Peery said.

“I don’t think he’ll get out of there alive and that’s what I hope. He needs to die there,” she said. “He was going to kill Susan. I know it was pure grace that she survived, that she escaped.”

Marable’s missing person case remains open with the Yakima Police Department. Someone knows something, Shortt-Peery said. She urged those with information to call the department at 509-575-6200.

“If anybody knows information ... that could possibly be what became of her, please come forward. ... Do the right thing and call the police, call Crimestoppers, call somebody and remain anonymous,” Shortt-Peery said. “Say something just so we can look into it.

“It’s been 28 years. It’s time for this to come to a close.”

Reach Tammy Ayer at tayer@yakimaherald.com or on Facebook.