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The site for Yakima Housing Authority’s proposed housing facility for homeless veterans, a former Marine Corps Reserve armory, is photographed on Tahoma Avenue in Yakima, Wash., Monday, July 11, 2016. (SHAWN GUST/Yakima Herald-Republic)

State lawmakers Jeremie Dufault and Chris Corry have requested $2.55 million from the state’s capital budget to help pay for a $17 million housing project for homeless veterans in Yakima.

The project aims to convert the former Marine Corps Reserve armory at 1702 Tahoma Ave. into housing for homeless veterans with on-site medical and other services.

Last week, Dufault, R-Selah, and Corry, R-Yakima, submitted their request to the House Capital Budget Committee, according to a news release announcing the request.

“Our veterans have made great sacrifices to ensure we can live in freedom. We need to make sure when they return home, they and their families have a place to live and that they can get the services necessary to keep them from being homeless. This is just one small, but very important way to thank them for their service and sacrifice to our country,” Dufault, a major in the U.S. Army Reserve, said in the release.

The project will feature 27 one- and two-bedroom units for families, 14 studio apartments and treatment space for medial and other service providers.

“Helping our veterans at home is a priority for my work in Olympia,” Corry, R-Yakima, said in the release.

The former armory was donated to the Yakima Housing Authority in 2017 after it became federal surplus property.

More than $14 million for the project has been secured through low-income housing tax credits, the state trust fund, the city of Yakima and other sources, said Housing Authority Director Lowel Krueger.

The $2.55 million — if approved — would assure medical and other service facilities are completed, he said.

Adoption of the capital budget is expected by April.

“This will be the last piece to happen,” Krueger said.

Construction is expected to begin in June and take about a year to complete, he said.